Reheated carbs prevent blood sugar spikes

Reheated carbs prevent  blood sugar spikes as opposed to freshly cooked carbohydrates.

 

reheated carbs prevent blood sugar spike

 

Starchy carbohydrates such as potatoes and pasta are notorious for spiking blood sugar levels in many people. After cooking, cooling, and reheating a pasta dish, researchers Dr Chris van Tulleken and Dr Denise Robertson of the University of Surrey found that blood sugar levels had a lower spike than if the food was eaten fresh. This was due to changes in composition in the pasta resulting in more resistant starch per serving.

The study was conducted over three days in an Italian restaurant. Participants ate fresh pasta on the first day and measured blood sugar levels every 15 minutes. On the second day, they ate cool pasta and measured blood sugar as on the first day. The third day, they were served reheated pasta and monitored their blood sugar levels. The third days showed participants had the lowest levels and prevented a sharp blood sugar spike.

 

Temperature changes cause starch to transform to resistant starch

The researchers explain that every time the temperature of these foods is changed, the chemical structure changes as well. Carbohydrates are usually digested easily by the gut and converted to glucose. However, the process of heating, cooling and reheating transforms the carbohydrates into resistant starches which are harder for the gut to digest. Resistant starches are a type of dietary fiber that “resist” digestion and conversion to circulating glucose (or to fat if unused as energy) which is the culprit of blood sugar spikes. Blood sugar levels do not spike as high in reheat pasta as compared to freshly cooked pasta because the reheated pasta now has a higher concentration of resistant starches. So therefore, reheated carbohydrates prevent blood sugar spikes.

Benefits of resistant starch

Keeping blood sugar levels low is an important goal for brain health. Alzheimer’s is commonly called type 3 diabetes. Resistant starches help the body burn calories faster by producing butyrate, a type of fatty acid, in the large intestine. Butyrate helps the body burn fat for fuel instead of carbohydrates. Reducing  obesity by burning fat is important as obesity has been linked to neuronal damage. Finally, due to the bulky character of resistant starches in the gut, the feeling of fullness shuts off the hunger hormones and the brain as a result will slow down food consumption. As a result, fullness faster will prevent overeating at a meal.An interesting question therefore is whether, reheated carbohydrates also are eaten in lesser quantities than freshly cooked food.
Maybe the unpopularity of leftovers answers that question!
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